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Title:Static and cyclic fatigue failure at high temperature in ceramics containing grain boundary viscous phase part 1-experiments
Author(s):Dey, Nishit; Socie, Darrell F.; Hsia, K. Jimmy
Subject(s):Fatigue Behavior
Static Loading
High Temperature
Grain Boundary Viscous Phase
Abstract:Fatigue behavior of a commercial grade alumina with 6 wt % of grain boundary viscous phase was investigated at 1000 C. Uniaxial tensile tests were conducted under both static and cyclic loadings. Under static loading, two failure mechanisms are observed: at high stresses, fracture is dictated by slow growth of a single dominant flaw along the grain boundaries; at low stresses fracture occurs due to the nucleation, growth and linkage of multiple macrocracks. In the stress range used in this investigation, fracture under cyclic loading was dominated by the slow crack growth of a single dominant crack. In the slow crack growth regime, the lifetime under cyclic loading was greater than that under static loading (for the same maximum stress) by approximately a factor of 30. Extensive crack surface bridging by viscous grain boundary phase behind the crack tip is observed and believed to be the most important factor for retarding crack growth during cyclic loading.
Issue Date:1993-11
Publisher:Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. College of Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Series/Report:TAM R 736
1993-6034
Genre:Technical Report
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/112426
ISSN:0073-5264
Rights Information:Copyright 1993 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-11-04


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  • Technical Reports - Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (TAM)
    TAM technical reports include manuscripts intended for publication, theses judged to have general interest, notes prepared for short courses, symposia compiled from outstanding undergraduate projects, and reports prepared for research-sponsoring agencies.

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