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Title:On crack identification and characterization in beam by nonlinear vibration analysis
Author(s):Sundermeyer, Jeffry N.; Weaver, Richard L.
Subject(s):Crack Identification
Beam
Nonlinear Vibration Analysis
Abstract:The weakly nonlinear character of a cracked vibrating beam is exploited for the purpose of determining crack location, depth, and opening load. The approach is motivated by examining the response of a bilinear spring-mass system to excitation at two frequencies, such that the difference between the two frequencies is the resonant frequency of the system. The numerically generated steady-state response of the system clearly betrays the presence of the bilinear spring, even if the difference between the compressive and tensile stiffness is very small. The same idea is applied to a cracked beam forced at two frequencies, with the crack providing a local bilinear stiffness in the beam. The numerically generated steady-state response shows the effect of the opening and closing of the crack. The prominence of this nonlinear effect is then correlated with crack position and depth. It is shown that the nonlinear effect is maximized if a static load is also placed on the beam that would cause the crack to be on the verge of opening, thus determining the opening load.
Issue Date:1993-12
Publisher:Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. College of Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Series/Report:TAM R 743
1993-6041
Genre:Technical Report
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/112434
ISSN:0073-5264
Rights Information:Copyright 1993 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-11-04


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  • Technical Reports - Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (TAM)
    TAM technical reports include manuscripts intended for publication, theses judged to have general interest, notes prepared for short courses, symposia compiled from outstanding undergraduate projects, and reports prepared for research-sponsoring agencies.

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