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Title:Multiple scattering theory for plate with sprung masses mean and mean- square responses
Author(s):Weaver, Richard L.
Subject(s):Multiple Scattering Theory
Sprung Masses
Mean And Mean-square Responses
Abstract:Diagrammatic multiple scattering theory is applied to the case of an infinite homogeneous plate in flexure attached to a random distribution of sprung masses. This system is a prototypical example of a wave-bearing master structure with a locally reacting 'fuzzy' substructure. Results are obtained from the first order smoothing approximation, the Foldy average t-matrix approximation, and Soven's Coherent-potential approximation. It is found that the attenuation as calculated by Pierce et al differs from that of the multiple scattering theory by a fractional amount which is small if the individual sprung masses are weak. It is also found that fluctuations away from the mean are weak if the spectral and areal density of sprung masses is great. A radiative transfer equation is found to govern the flow of energy on time scales greater than the inverse of the frequency, and a diffusion equation is found to govern the flow of energy at times greater than the dwell time of energy in the substructure.
Issue Date:1996-07
Publisher:Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. College of Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Series/Report:TAM R 828
1996-6015
Genre:Technical Report
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/112529
ISSN:0073-5264
Sponsor:Multiple Scattering Theory; Sprung Masses; Mean and Mean-Square Responses
Rights Information:Copyright 1996 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-11-04


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  • Technical Reports - Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (TAM)
    TAM technical reports include manuscripts intended for publication, theses judged to have general interest, notes prepared for short courses, symposia compiled from outstanding undergraduate projects, and reports prepared for research-sponsoring agencies.

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