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Title:Effects of moving wavy bondary on channel flow instabilities
Author(s):Yoo, Sunhee; Riahi, Daniel N.
Subject(s):Moving Wavy Bondary
Channel Flow Instabilities
Abstract:Instabilities of channel flow over a moving wavy boundary are investigated for an extensive range of values of the Reynolds number R below its critical value Re. The shear flow is bounded from above by a flat boundary and from below by a wavy boundary which moves at a constant speed in the streamwise direction. The basic flow consists of the original parabolic profile plus boundary wave, due to the wavy boundary, and in the presence or absence of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) wave. Both systems for part of the basic flow due to the boundary wave and the TS wave and for three-dimensional infinitesimal disturbances superimposed on the basic flow are solved numerically by applying spectral collocation technique. Certain forms of the wavy boundary under certain speeds are found to be stabilizing, while some other types of the wavy boundary with certain speeds are found to be destabilizing. The shape and speed of the wavy boundary can affect significantly the parametric resonance, transition path and the spatial and temporal structure of the peak-valley type vortices which may evolve due to threedimensional instabilities of the basic flow.
Issue Date:1999-11
Publisher:Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics. College of Engineering. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Series/Report:TAM R 923
1999-6025
Genre:Technical Report
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/112632
ISSN:0073-5264
Rights Information:Copyright 1999 Board of Trustees of the University of Illinois
Date Available in IDEALS:2021-11-04


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  • Technical Reports - Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (TAM)
    TAM technical reports include manuscripts intended for publication, theses judged to have general interest, notes prepared for short courses, symposia compiled from outstanding undergraduate projects, and reports prepared for research-sponsoring agencies.

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