Files in this item

FilesDescriptionFormat

application/pdf

application/pdfIMIR-THESIS-2021.pdf (2MB)
(no description provided)PDF

Description

Title:The effects of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and high fat diet on metabolism, reproductive health & prostate cancer progression
Author(s):Imir, Ozan Berk
Advisor(s):Madak-Erdogan, Zeynep
Contributor(s):Flaws, Jodi A; Irudayaraj, Joseph MK
Department / Program:Nutritional Sciences
Discipline:Nutritional Sciences
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:M.S.
Genre:Thesis
Subject(s):cancer
prostate
perfluoroalkyl substance
Abstract:Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are a group of synthetic chemicals that have been utilized in various industries and settings. Their resistance to water, oil, grease, and extreme temperatures enabled utilization of PFAS in adhesives, cleaning-products, paints, coatings, packaging, building materials, and firefighting foams. Due to highly fluorinated carbon chains ranging in length, PFAS are resistant to decomposition, and have increased longevity in media, such as soil, water, dust, and air. Because of increased stability in the environment, many communities in the US are exposed to high concentration of PFAS. Multiple studies reported increased PFAS blood concentrations in fluorochemical factory workers, office workers, and firefighters, all of which are exposed to these materials on a day-to-day basis. Epidemiological studies linked PFAS exposures to increased risk of various pathological conditions including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, infertility, and cancer. Epidemiological studies suggested a link between increased blood PFAS levels and prostate cancer incidence, but the mechanism of action for such a phenomenon is unknown. In the present thesis research, we investigated how PFAS impacts prostate cancer metabolism, progression, and prognosis. We tested the hypothesis that metabolic alterations from high fat diets combined with PFAS exposures play a significant role in prostate cancer initiation and tumor progression.
Issue Date:2021-07-21
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/113084
Rights Information:Copyright 2021 Ozan Berk Imir
Date Available in IDEALS:2022-01-12
Date Deposited:2021-08


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Item Statistics