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Title:An examination of the impact of multiple behavior interventions and underlying processes on behavioral and clinical change
Author(s):White, Benjamin
Director of Research:Albarracin, Dolores
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Albarracin, Dolores
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Smith, Douglas C; Briley, Daniel A; Gothe, Neha; Laurent, Sean M
Department / Program:Psychology
Discipline:Psychology
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Mediational Processes
Behavior Change
Intervention
Abstract:We conducted a comprehensive meta-analysis of multiple behavior interventions to assess the impact of the effects of number of recommendations on change in behavioral and clinical outcomes and proposed a theoretical process framework that categorizes how recommending multiple behavioral changes may result in more substantive change. The framework distinguished non-elaborative processes that require minimal conscious effort from elaborative processes that do. I first tested the presence and shape of a relation between number of recommendations and resulting behavioral and clinical change, with a positive linear relation suggesting non-elaborative processes and a curvilinear relation suggesting elaborative processes. I then test five potential mediators that could explain these processes: behavioral cuing, psychological wellbeing, information, behavioral skills, or motivation. The meta-analysis included 317 papers yielding 638 independent samples collected from a variety of populations and encompassing lifestyle, HIV, and substance use interventions. Results showed a positive effect of recommendations regardless of number of recommendations, suggesting non-elaborative processes may account for the majority of benefits. These processes appeared to be mediated by changes in well-being and, to a lesser extent, information and were found to help establish behavior change but not maintain it.
Issue Date:2021-07-15
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/113192
Rights Information:Copyright 2021 Benjamin White
Date Available in IDEALS:2022-01-12
Date Deposited:2021-08


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