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Title:Ion transport and viscoelasticity of dynamic polymer network electrolytes
Author(s):Jing, Brian B.
Director of Research:Evans, Christopher M
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Evans, Christopher M
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Sottos, Nancy R; Schwerizer, Kenneth S; Rogers, Simon A
Department / Program:Materials Science & Engineerng
Discipline:Materials Science & Engr
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Polymer
Ion Tranpost
Viscoealsticity
Dynamic Network
Abstract:Dynamic networks have strong potential to be one of the most influential materials in science. They are highly versatile due to having mechanical robustness and integrity, while also being malleable and degradable. Traditionally, these materials have been developed for self-healing and recycling applications. The work of this thesis demonstrates that these materials can be designed for functional applications such as ion transport. PEO-based boronic ester networks were synthesized and characterized as Li-conducting electrolytes. Systematic studies of salt concentration and linker length were investigated. As the linker length is varied, the effects of salt addition also vary. For 2EO and 4EO linker dynamic networks, the addition of salt has a more dramatic effect on the conductive and viscoelastic behavior, due to the formation of Lewis adducts which disrupt the crosslinking density of the networks. This results in the relaxation behavior to shift from an Arrhenius temperature dependence to a VFT dependence. Furthermore, these dynamic network electrolytes disobey the Walden Rule, as their conductivity and viscosity are uncorrelated. Vinylogous urethane dynamic networks doped with salt were also synthesized and investigated. Spectroscopy analysis revealed that the cation could coordinate with the vinylogous urethane moiety to facilitate exchange reactions.
Issue Date:2021-10-01
Type:Thesis
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/114044
Rights Information:Copyright 2021 Brian B. Jing
Date Available in IDEALS:2022-04-29
Date Deposited:2021-12


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