Browse Student Posters and Presentations by Series/Report

    Series/Report
    Deanna Williams, Instructor [8]
    English 106 Spring 2013 Parkland College [2]
    EPS 199 Ethnography in a Community Context [3]
    In today’s world, sport and athletics are ubiquitous and central to the lives, imaginations, and consumer behaviors of many people. Through readings and a variety of media and active learning experiences this course familiarizes students with important issues and perspectives related to the study and criticism of sport and modern society. The course focuses upon themes in sport studies such as those having to do with the nature of sport, hegemony theory, and body culture. [1]
    KIN 249 Fall 2010 [4]
    KIN/SOC 249 Fall 2010 [1]
    Linda Larsen, Instructor [2]
    Professor Synthia Sydnor [2]
    Rhetoric 105 was designed to help students develop their reading, writing, and research skills and lay a foundation for the rest of their University career. This course gave students practice in: critically reading and analyzing texts, forming arguments, gathering and evaluating research, synthesizing multiple sources, conducting qualitative research, and composing (inventing, drafting, revising). This section of Rhet. 105 was centered on the theme of “Race and the University.” Our course was part of UIUC’s Ethnography of the University Initiative (EUI)—a cross-campus initiative that supports undergraduate research about the university experience and encourages the archiving of this research. The assignments and discussions asked students to explore their own experience as a UIUC student and consider issues of race in higher education. Students conducted their own qualitative research through observations, interviews, and surveys. [9]
    Rhetoric 233 Spring 2013 [2]
    SOC249 Section AL1 (Sport & Modern Society) [2]
    Sport and Modern Society [5]
    Spring 2013; Nicole Lamers, Instructor [3]
    Synthia Sydnor, Instructor [5]
    This course is designed to introduce students to major ideas and themes in the study of higher education while providing a first introduction to research in the field. The class will provide an overview of the organization and structure of American higher education, helping to situate future coursework and studies. Finally, the course is affiliated the Ethnography of the University Initiative (EUI). Through this affiliation, students will undertake original research on historic or modern issues/concerns/topics at the University of Illinois and produce lasting knowledge about this institution, its culture, and its students. As members undertake their own research, they will interrogate the research in the field. By the end of the course, students should: (1) Understand the development of the modern field of higher education. (2) Be able to articulate the major trends in research on higher education. (3) Be critical readers and users of research on higher education. (4) Understand the diversity and organization of American higher education. (5) Have experience asking and exploring questions involving stakeholders of the University of Illinois. (6) Be able to relate their projects to existing literature and/or research on the University of Illinois. [5]
    This course offered an introduction to the interdisciplinary critical whiteness studies literature and addressed concepts such as the social construction of race, white privilege, white racial identity development, and white anti-racism. It also focused on various qualitative research methods that scholars use in the empirical investigation of whiteness. Throughout the course, we considered the ways in which the various content and methods may apply to understanding whiteness at predominantly white universities. [5]
    This course offers an introduction to the interdisciplinary critical whiteness studies literature and addresses concepts such as white privilege, white racial identity development, and white anti-racism. It also focuses on various qualitative research methods that scholars use in the empirical investigation of whiteness. Throughout the course, we will consider the ways in which the various content and methods may apply to understanding whiteness at predominantly white universities. [13]
    This course, a First Year Discovery Program and Ethnography of the University Initiative (EUI), has two major interrelated aims: (1) The course introduces students to cultural ethnographic method/theory and criticism related to the study of contemporary sport and play. This is accomplished by sampling both older “classic” works and recent significant projects in the area of study. (2) Throughout the semester, students are engaged in group work that conducts original primary research/ fieldwork/ethnography centered on skateboarding and the University of Illinois community. The work of the semester is not so much on a final “polished” ethnography, but rather an ongoing reflection on issues such as: What are the key terms, questions, data, and significance of my unique project? Is sport a unique cultural formation? What about the anthropology of skateboarding and skateboard culture? What links can be made between my work and others' ideas/experiences? How can I make a difference with my project? What conflicts, issues, etc. may begin to reach resolution through the contribution of my work? In what genres/forms can we communicate the above to others [1]
    This course, a First Year Discovery Program and Ethnography of the University Initiative (EUI), has two major interrelated aims: (1) The course introduces students to cultural ethnographic method/theory and criticism related to the study of contemporary sport and play. This is accomplished by sampling both older “classic” works and recent significant projects in the area of study. (2) Throughout the semester, students are engaged in group work that conducts original primary research/ fieldwork/ethnography centered on skateboarding and the University of Illinois community. The work of the semester is not so much on a final “polished” ethnography, but rather an ongoing reflection on issues such as: What are the key terms, questions, data, and significance of my unique project? Is sport a unique cultural formation? What about the anthropology of skateboarding and skateboard culture? What links can be made between my work and others' ideas/experiences? How can I make a difference with my project? What conflicts, issues, etc. may begin to reach resolution through the contribution of my work? In what genres/forms can we communicate the above to others? [2]
    When did Muslims arrive in the Americas? What is the history of Muslim immigrants in the United States? This course was an introduction to the study of Muslims in the United States. In examining the multiple racial, cultural, and national groups that make-up this diverse community, students questioned what it means to be Muslim in America. The course began with the first contact between Islam and America in the “Age of Discovery” and the African slave trade to think through the roots of Islam and its role in the contemporary moment. In this moment students also examined how indigenous Americans, referred to as American Indians, are conceptualized in relation to the Muslims of Europe and simultaneously racialized. In historicizing Islam students examined the communities who first arrived as crypto-Muslims to understand the place of Latinos in American Islam. Second, students examined African American Islam in its myriad formations. These two examples were then used comparatively to understand how the historical narrative of African American and Latino Muslims is related to newer immigrant populations. In large part, students surveyed Arab American and South Asian American Muslim communities particularly in urban contexts. These later two populations grew through large immigrant waves in the 19th century and the late twentieth century, particularly after 1965. In addition to the multi-racial and comparative perspective, this course examined intra-religious (sectarian) and interfaith differences and dialogues. This material was explored through an interdisciplinary approach focusing on the scholarship mainly from anthropology, history, sociology, religious studies, and ethnic studies. For many of class discussions this course used Chicago as an ethnographic site to explore the complex make-up and history of Muslim America. [20]