Browse Student Posters and Presentations by Series/Report

    Series/Report
    Anthropology 103, Spring 2017 [7]
    As part of the Ethnographic University Initiative, we will work together to establish a collegial research community in the class. Thus, as you develop your independent research projects we all will have opportunities to give and receive feedback throughout the semester. My hope is that you will strengthen your understanding of the research process and your self-efficacy as researchers. By effectively investigating some aspect of whiteness at the University of Illinois, we will contribute in meaningful ways to understanding how whiteness operates in one of the contexts in which we live. [8]
    As part of the Ethnography of the University Initiative, we worked together to establish a collegial research community in the class. Thus, students developed their independent research projects, and they were expected to strengthen their understanding of the research process and self-efficacy as researchers. By effectively investigating some aspect of whiteness at the University of Illinois, this course aimed at contributing in meaningful ways to understanding how whiteness operates in one of the contexts in which we live. [5]
    Deanna Williams, Instructor [2]
    Educational Policy Studies 199, Spring 2017 [5]
    English 106 Spring 2013 Parkland College [2]
    EPS 199 Ethnography in a Community Context [3]
    In today’s world, sport and athletics are ubiquitous and central to the lives, imaginations, and consumer behaviors of many people. Through readings and a variety of media and active learning experiences this course familiarizes students with important issues and perspectives related to the study and criticism of sport and modern society. The course focuses upon themes in sport studies such as those having to do with the nature of sport, hegemony theory, and body culture. [1]
    KIN 249 Fall 2010 [2]
    KIN/SOC 249 Fall 2010 [1]
    Linda Larsen, Instructor [2]
    Media and Cinema Studies 207, Spring 2017 [6]
    Professor Synthia Sydnor [1]
    Rhetoric 105 was designed to help students develop their reading, writing, and research skills and lay a foundation for the rest of their University career. This course gave students practice in: critically reading and analyzing texts, forming arguments, gathering and evaluating research, synthesizing multiple sources, conducting qualitative research, and composing (inventing, drafting, revising). This section of Rhet. 105 was centered on the theme of “Race and the University.” Our course was part of UIUC’s Ethnography of the University Initiative (EUI)—a cross-campus initiative that supports undergraduate research about the university experience and encourages the archiving of this research. The assignments and discussions asked students to explore their own experience as a UIUC student and consider issues of race in higher education. Students conducted their own qualitative research through observations, interviews, and surveys. [2]
    Rhetoric 233 Spring 2013 [2]
    SOC249 Section AL1 (Sport & Modern Society) [1]
    Sport and Modern Society [3]
    Spring 2013; Nicole Lamers, Instructor [3]
    Synthia Sydnor, Instructor [3]
    This course is designed to introduce students to major ideas and themes in the study of higher education while providing a first introduction to research in the field. The class will provide an overview of the organization and structure of American higher education, helping to situate future coursework and studies. Finally, the course is affiliated the Ethnography of the University Initiative (EUI). Through this affiliation, students will undertake original research on historic or modern issues/concerns/topics at the University of Illinois and produce lasting knowledge about this institution, its culture, and its students. As members undertake their own research, they will interrogate the research in the field. By the end of the course, students should: (1) Understand the development of the modern field of higher education. (2) Be able to articulate the major trends in research on higher education. (3) Be critical readers and users of research on higher education. (4) Understand the diversity and organization of American higher education. (5) Have experience asking and exploring questions involving stakeholders of the University of Illinois. (6) Be able to relate their projects to existing literature and/or research on the University of Illinois. [4]