1969: Serial Publications in Large Libraries

 

Allerton Park Institute Proceedings (no. 16, 1969); Edited by Walter C. Allen

If ever there was a perplexing area in librarianship, it is the handling of serial publications. It is inconceivable that any library could operate without them. It is equally inconceivable that any library can cope with them without experiencing some sort of trauma. The enormous numbers of them, their endless variety, their lasting qualities (as to both physical properties and content), their arrangement and handling present daily and frequently difficult problems. And, the larger the library, the more these problems emerge to plague the many librarians who have to deal with them. Users face difficulties too, and it is, of course, the aim of the librarians to minimize these. The planning committee conceived this Allerton Park Institute, the sixteenth in the series annually sponsored by the Graduate School of Library Science of the University of Illinois, as a step by step discussion of the many phases of dealing with serials. From Sunday, November 2, to Wednesday, November 5, 1969, over one hundred speakers and participants met at the University's conference center, Allerton House, a few miles from Monticello, Illinois.

The complete text of the Institute is available here as well as the individual papers. The papers included here are:

The Proceedings of the Allerton Park Institute have been digitized through the Open Content Alliance at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

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    Kuhn, Warren B. (Graduate School of Library Science. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign., 1969)
    In ancient Greece King Augeas was the ruler of Elis who had difficulties with his housekeeping. By skillful attention to an acquisition program with his bulls zestfully engaged in their own activities, he had managed to ...

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  • Woods, Bill M. (Graduate School of Library Science. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign., 1969)
    An important problem with serials is bibliographic control. What good does it do for libraries to select, acquire, record, catalog, and bind large holdings of serial publications if the contents of those serials remain ...

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  • Gillies, Thomas D. (Graduate School of Library Science. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign., 1969)
    Bibliographically, document serials, do not differ substantially from other serials. Their acquisition is largely dependent upon the use of enumerative bibliographies which identify them; their use, upon the subject ...

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  • Hammer, Donald P. (Graduate School of Library Science. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign., 1969)
    While many areas of library operations can be improved or even radically transformed by automation, the one area that probably stands to gain most, and needs the most help, is serials. It has been well known for ages that ...

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  • Lazerow, Samuel (Graduate School of Library Science. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign., 1969)
    Consideration of serials has, to some extent, been pushed aside, allegedly temporarily, as we have struggled for solutions to many other complex library problems. The sheer volume of serial holdings in large research ...

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