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The relationship between melody and prosody: perception and production capabilities of musicians and non-musicians

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Title: The relationship between melody and prosody: perception and production capabilities of musicians and non-musicians
Author(s): Copeland, Naomi C.
Director of Research: McPherson, Gary E.
Doctoral Committee Chair(s): DeNardo, Gregory F.
Doctoral Committee Member(s): Grant, Joe W.; McPherson, Gary E.; Watson, Duane G.
Department / Program: Music
Discipline: Music Education
Degree Granting Institution: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree: Ph.D.
Genre: Dissertation
Subject(s): music music education cognitive psychology music aptitude Gordon neuromusic
Abstract: Music and language are two interconnected acoustic and cognitive phenomena shared by human beings. Among their similarities are their variety of intonations and inflections resulting in melody and prosody, respectively. Previous research has demonstrated that musicians are more successful than non-musicians at detecting pitch errors in speech and melody. These results are often due to extensive musical training beginning at an early age. In examining melodic and prosodic abilities of twenty-nine university undergraduates, this study attempts to better understand the connectedness between these cognitive functions, and the affects various musical experiences may have. To assess these abilities, three production stimuli were developed and Gordon’s Advanced Measures of Music Audiation was used. Statistical analysis demonstrated significantly strong correlations between total length of musical experience as well as the age formal instruction first began. In recognizing the potential transferred effects of beginning and continuing musical training, this study may help to support pedagogical and curricular decisions regarding when and for how long to offer music instruction, in addition to contributing to current research on music education and cognitive psychology.
Issue Date: 2010-05-19
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/16061
Rights Information: Copyright 2010 Naomi Chaya Copeland
Date Available in IDEALS: 2010-05-19
Date Deposited: 2010-05
 

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