IDEALS Home University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign logo The Alma Mater The Main Quad

An integrated multimodal intervention approach to support

Show full item record

Bookmark or cite this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/16098

Files in this item

File Description Format
PDF King_Amie.pdf (790KB) (no description provided) PDF
Title: An integrated multimodal intervention approach to support
Author(s): King, Amie M.
Director of Research: Hengst, Julie A.
Doctoral Committee Chair(s): Hengst, Julie A.
Doctoral Committee Member(s): DeThorne, Laura S.; Halle, James W.; Johnson, Cynthia J.; Duff, Melissa C.
Department / Program: Speech & Hearing Science
Discipline: Speech & Hearing Science
Degree Granting Institution: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree: Ph.D.
Genre: Dissertation
Subject(s): augmentative and alternative communication severe speech impairment childhood apraxia of speech integrated intervention treatment single subject methods
Abstract: Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) is often viewed as a “last resort” for children with severe speech sound impairments, with AAC consideration only occurring after years of failed traditional speech therapy. Two main reasons this occurs is because (a) parents view AAC as “giving up” on speech, and (b) parents and speech-language pathologists (SLPs) often believe that implementing AAC will negatively affect natural speech development. These views have consequently led SLPs to dichotomize intervention for these children; either work on natural speech or implement AAC. Recent research has suggested this may not have to be a choice SLPs have to make. This study’s purpose was to examine the effects of an integrated multimodal intervention designed to increase the quantity and quality of natural speech production in children who are multimodal communicators due to severe speech sound impairment. A hybrid research design was used to determine the treatment’s effectiveness, including single-subject design methodology and qualitative methodology. Three children served as participants, with each child participating in a series of baseline and intervention sessions. The data obtained from the participants suggested the intervention had positive effects on their speech production abilities. Theoretical and clinical implications of these findings are discussed.
Issue Date: 2010-05-19
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/16098
Rights Information: Copyright 2010 Amie M. King
Date Available in IDEALS: 2010-05-19
Date Deposited: May 2010
 

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

Item Statistics

  • Total Downloads: 1185
  • Downloads this Month: 14
  • Downloads Today: 1

Browse

My Account

Information

Access Key