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Manuscript - Home range dynamics of sympatric vole populations: influence of food resources, population density, interspecific competition, and mating system

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Title: Manuscript - Home range dynamics of sympatric vole populations: influence of food resources, population density, interspecific competition, and mating system
Author(s): Getz, Lowell L.; Hofmann, Joyce E.; McGuire, Betty; Oli, Madan K.
Subject(s): Voles Home range Microtus ochrogaster Microtus pennsylvanicus
Abstract: We studied variation in home range size in fluctuating populations of Microtus ochrogaster and M. pennsylvanicus in alfalfa, bluegrass and tallgrass habitats over a 25-year period in east-central Illinois. The three habitats differed in food availability and vegetative cover. Home range indices of both species were complexly related to abundance of food resources. Home ranges of M. ochrogaster were smallest in the high food habitat (alfalfa), largest in the low food habitat (tallgrass) and intermediate in medium food habitat (bluegrass). M. pennsylvanicus home ranges were largest in the low food habitat, but did not differ between the high and intermediate food habitats. M. ochrogaster did not have smaller home ranges in supplementally fed medium and low food habitats; those of M. pennsylvanicus were smaller only in the low food habitat. Home ranges of M. ochrogaster were compressed only at population densities above 100/ha, irrespective of food levels; those of M. pennsylvanicus were smaller at high densities only in medium and low food habitats. Presence of the other species did not influence size of home ranges of either species. Withinhabitat seasonal variation in home range indices indicated a confounding response to cover (prey risk) and food. Home ranges of all age classes of M. pennsylvanicus were larger than those of M. ochrogaster in all three habitats. There was no obvious relationship between home range sizes of adult males and females in relation to the mating system of each species. For both species in all three habitats, home ranges of adult males were larger than those of adult females.
Issue Date: 2004
Genre: Working / Discussion Paper
Type: Text
Language: English
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/168
Publication Status: published or submitted for publication
Rights Information: Copyright held by authors
Date Available in IDEALS: 2007-01-03
 

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