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Title:Bioanalytical applications of microfluidic devices
Author(s):Zhang, Huaibin
Director of Research:Nuzzo, Ralph G.
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Nuzzo, Ralph G.
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Bailey, Ryan C.; Gewirth, Andrew A.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.
Department / Program:Chemistry
Discipline:Chemistry
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Microfluidic devices
Patterning
polyacrylamide hydrogel
biomolecule
Peptide
protein
polysaccharides
microfluidic contact printing
Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA)
alkaline dehybridization
single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP)
genotyping
point-of-care
isothermal genotyping
stop-flow lithography
kinetic discrimination
Abstract:The first part of the thesis describes a new patterning technique--microfluidic contact printing--that combines several of the desirable aspects of microcontact printing and microfluidic patterning and addresses some of their important limitations through the integration of a track-etched polycarbonate (PCTE) membrane. Using this technique, biomolecules (e.g., peptides, polysaccharides, and proteins) were printed in high fidelity on a receptor modified polyacrylamide hydrogel substrate. The patterns obtained can be controlled through modifications of channel design and secondary programming via selective membrane wetting. The protocols support the printing of multiple reagents without registration steps and fast recycle times. The second part describes a non-enzymatic, isothermal method to discriminate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). SNP discrimination using alkaline dehybridization has long been neglected because the pH range in which thermodynamic discrimination can be done is quite narrow. We found, however, that SNPs can be discriminated by the kinetic differences exhibited in the dehybridization of PM and MM DNA duplexes in an alkaline solution using fluorescence microscopy. We combined this method with multifunctional encoded hydrogel particle array (fabricated by stop-flow lithography) to achieve fast kinetics and high versatility. This approach may serve as an effective alternative to temperature-based method for analyzing unamplified genomic DNA in point-of-care diagnostic.
Issue Date:2010-08-31
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/16967
Rights Information:Copyright 2010 Huaibin Zhang
Date Available in IDEALS:2010-08-31
2012-09-07
Date Deposited:2010-08


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