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Brincamos el charco y ahora que: Historicizing Puerto Rican education in Chicago, 1967-1977

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Title: Brincamos el charco y ahora que: Historicizing Puerto Rican education in Chicago, 1967-1977
Author(s): Velazquez, Mirelsie
Director of Research: Parker, Laurence J.
Doctoral Committee Chair(s): Parker, Laurence J.
Doctoral Committee Member(s): Anderson, James D.; Torrès, Arlene; Fernandez, Lilia
Department / Program: Educational Policy Studies
Discipline: Educational Policy Studies
Degree Granting Institution: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree: Ph.D.
Genre: Dissertation
Subject(s): Latina/o Studies History of American Education Puerto Rican History Urban Education
Abstract: This dissertation serves as a historical and cultural analysis of the educational experiences of Puerto Ricans in Chicago following the Division Street Riot of 1966 till 1977, chronicling the ways in which the racialization of Puerto Ricans in Chicago has resulted in schooling inequalities, forcing community response in the hopes to alleviate concerns. I critically assess the city of Chicago as the space that this population comes to navigate, negotiate, and embody as a marker of who they are as a racialized group. Schools then become the place where Puerto Ricans can begin to gain a sense of security, share their lived experiences and hope to meet their practical needs. Further, schools serve as a place in which the creation and maintenance of identities are undertaken. I will contextualize how the Puerto Rican community began to confront the ways their claim to space within the city of Chicago was intricately linked to the schooling inequalities and challenges faced within city schools. I critically examine the role of the media, and other print culture, played in not only addressing the schooling concerns of the community, but as a vehicle through which the creation and affirmation of Puerto Rican identities was undertaken. I further discuss the role of women in forming of a politicized Puerto Rican community in Chicago, while tracking the intellectual history of this group. Indeed, the fight against Puerto Rican educational inequality was very much a community effort.
Issue Date: 2010-08-31
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/17053
Rights Information: Copyright 2010 Mirelsie Velazquez
Date Available in IDEALS: 2010-08-31
2012-09-07
Date Deposited: 2010-08
 

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