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Title: Comparing Teenage Pregnancy Rates and Teenage Birth Rates Between States that Do and Do Not Mandate Sex or STD/HIV Education Programs
Author(s): Summerville, Brian S.
Advisor(s): Farner, Susan M.
Department / Program: Kinesiology & Community Health
Discipline: Community Health
Degree Granting Institution: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree: M.S.
Genre: Thesis
Subject(s): Teenage Pregnancy
Teenage Birth Rate
STD/HIV Education
Sex Education
Abstract: In 2005, the teenage pregnancy rate increased for the first time in almost a decade. There are several negative outcomes associated with teenage pregnancy such as adverse health effects for mothers and infants and increased spending on welfare programs. The purpose of the study is to determine if there is a relationship between teenage pregnancy rates and teenage birth rates and the type of sex education program taught in public high schools. The research questions were (1) Is there a difference in teenage pregnancy rates or teenage birth rates between states that require public high schools to provide sex or STD/HIV education and those that do not? (2) Is there a difference in teenage pregnancy rates or teenage birth rates between states that provide comprehensive sex education programs and those that provide abstinence-only or abstinence-based sex education programs? Data on teenage pregnancy rates, teenage birth rates, state laws on sex education, and topics covered in public high schools were obtained from the Guttmacher Institute. The results show there is no significant difference in teenage pregnancy rates or teenage birth rates between states that require public high schools to provide sex or STD/HIV education programs and those that do not. There was also no significant difference between states that provide comprehensive sex education and those that provide abstinence-only or abstinence-based sex education. However, the results did show factors such as race and median household income have a significant impact on teenage pregnancy rates and teenage birth rates.
Issue Date: 2011-01-14
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/18302
Rights Information: Copyright 2010 Brian S. Summerville
Date Available in IDEALS: 2011-01-14
Date Deposited: December 2


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