Note: This is a student project from a course affiliated with the Ethnography of the University Initiative. EUI supports faculty development of courses in which students conduct original research on their university, and encourages students to think about colleges and universities in relation to their communities and within larger national and global contexts.

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Description

Title:The Role of Ethics and Documentation within the University of Illinois Biological Division of the Psychology Department
Author(s):Mullican, Sarah; Moots, Paul; Field, Travis; Heo, Youn
Subject(s):Administration/Services
Animal Care and Use
Ethics
Psychology
Departments
Abstract:This project investigates the role of ethics and documentation in live subject research within the Biological Division of the Psychology Department at the University of Illinois. On the basis of literature research and interviews, the authors provide a historical overview of the Department of Psychology and of institutes and procedures concerned with live subject research nationally and at the university. The study finds that, since companies providing research grants are usually large multinational companies or government agencies, state legislation is very inefficient at regulating the ethics and methods involved with live subject research. The only way the state could control live subject research would be to surpass the companies and national agencies in providing funding for research. Ethics and documentation can and does have overwhelming effects on psychologists’ live subject research. Most of these principles have evolved over time as psychological practices have changed.
Issue Date:2006-05-15
Genre:Essay
Type:Text
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/1885
Publication Status:unpublished
Date Available in IDEALS:2007-09-02


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