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Title:Relationship of learning style and academic discipline to corresponding course attrition
Author(s):Beaty, Vivian Cordilia
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Griggs, Mildred B.
Department / Program:Education
Discipline:Education
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Education, Adult and Continuing
Education, Vocational
Abstract:Economic conditions and the rising cost of higher education have made it difficult for many individuals to attend regularly scheduled on-campus college courses. Correspondence study, a method of course delivery found within distance education, provides an alternative for those unable to attend college in the traditional form. However, attrition rates for correspondence study programs range from 32% to 71% (Brindley, 1987; Wong & Wong, 1979; Woodley & Parlett, 1983). One method of addressing correspondence course attrition is to examine the relationship of learning style and academic discipline to course completion.
To examine the relationship of learning style to academic discipline, the four learning style categories of converger, assimilator, diverger, and accommodator were correlated with Becher's (1987) four academic discipline areas of applied science, pure science, humanities and pure social science, and applied social science. Data analysis for the research conducted consisted of chi-square correlation, analysis of variance, and stepwise regression analysis.
This study found no statistical significant correlation between learning style and academic discipline. There was also no statistical significant correlation between students who matched learning style with academic discipline and completed their correspondence course and students with a mismatch. There was no statistical significant difference in mean grades of students who matched learning style with academic discipline and completed their correspondence course and students with a mismatch. Through a stepwise regression analysis, age, and student effort in a correspondence course were statistically significant factors in correspondence course completion. As age increased, the likelihood of course completion decreased. Although statistical significant correlations were not shown between learning style and academic discipline, results of this study cannot be generalized beyond the present research population until similar research is conducted using a correspondence student population from another institution.
Issue Date:1994
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/18950
Rights Information:Copyright 1994 Beaty, Vivian Cordilia
Date Available in IDEALS:2011-05-07
Identifier in Online Catalog:AAI9512298
OCLC Identifier:(UMI)AAI9512298


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