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Title:Soviet science under control: The struggle for influence
Author(s):Roberg, Jeffrey Lawrence
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Kanet, Roger E.
Department / Program:Political Science
Discipline:Political Science
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):History, European
History of Science
Political Science, General
Abstract:This dissertation examines the relationship between the political leadership of the Soviet Union and Soviet science. The most frequent characterization of this relationship is dominant and submissive, respectively. Most authors have written that the Communist Party of the Soviet Union exerted influence on scientists' careers, access to foreign scientific publications, and interaction with their foreign colleagues in the Soviet Union and the ability of scientists to travel abroad. While this characterization is correct, it tends to be uni-directional. Furthermore, the literature usually ignores the relationship between science and the Party in the decision-making arena. In this dissertation, I argue that the relationship between science and the leadership is better viewed as bi-directional. Thus, I argue that science had an influence on policy-makers in the areas of nuclear policy and human rights although not to the same degree as the Party had on science. This dissertation also examines the relationship between the natural sciences and the political leadership in the post-Soviet context.
This dissertation makes two contributions to the existing literature. First, it examines the question of influence by documenting the influence certain Soviet scientists had on the Communist Party. Most of the current Soviet scientific literature uses the perspective of the Communist Party to examine how influence was applied to scientists. And second, I develop a new definition of influence challenging both Robert Dahl's outcome-oriented definition as well as the process-oriented definitions of Dean Schooler Jr. and William Gamson.
Issue Date:1996
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/19182
Rights Information:Copyright 1996 Roberg, Jeffrey Lawrence
Date Available in IDEALS:2011-05-07
Identifier in Online Catalog:AAI9625185
OCLC Identifier:(UMI)AAI9625185


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