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Title:High school course taking patterns and student postsecondary success: An exploratory study
Author(s):Morris, Joel Warren
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Thurston, Paul W.
Department / Program:Education
Discipline:Education
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ed.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Education, Secondary
Education, Higher
Abstract:Recent school reform efforts have focused on changes in student course taking patterns in order to improve student performance. The Illinois Board of Higher Education minimum college admission requirements, modeled on the recommendations of the National Commission for Excellence in Education, were designed to improve student performance in baccalaureate degree programs. Fifteen courses in the areas of English, mathematics, science, social science, and foreign language, art and music were required in order to be considered for admission to a baccalaureate degree program. The study focuses on the linkage between student completion of the core of academic courses and student postsecondary success.
A review of the literature demonstrates a relationship between student completion of academic courses and student performance on college admission tests. The review also establishes that student performance on college admission tests is a significant predictor of student postsecondary performance. No studies were found which directly linked student completion of a core of academic courses and student postsecondary success measured at the freshman year and as a cumulative grade point average at the end of four years.
The study uses student data from the High School and Beyond Study for the Class of 1982 for the state of Illinois. Student demographic data, high school transcript information, and student postsecondary transcript data was gathered on 377 students who were part of that study.
Based upon an analysis of that data, the researcher concluded that student postsecondary performance appears to be more closely related to student performance in high school, as measured by overall high school grade point average and high school grade point average in English, mathematics, science, social science, and foreign language. The best predictors of student postsecondary success appear to be a combination of high school grade point average and student performance on college admission tests. It did not appear necessary for students to complete all fifteen courses in English, mathematics, science, social science, and foreign language, art or music required by the Illinois Board of Higher Education in order to be successful in postsecondary institutions.
Issue Date:1990
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/19437
Rights Information:Copyright 1990 Morris, Joel Warren
Date Available in IDEALS:2011-05-07
Identifier in Online Catalog:AAI9026273
OCLC Identifier:(UMI)AAI9026273


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