IDEALS Home University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign logo The Alma Mater The Main Quad

Compatibility in the visual field and the use of nontraditional flight displays

Show simple item record

Bookmark or cite this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/19537

Files in this item

File Description Format
PDF 9021774.pdf (4MB) Restricted to U of Illinois (no description provided) PDF
Title: Compatibility in the visual field and the use of nontraditional flight displays
Author(s): Weinstein, Lisa F.
Doctoral Committee Chair(s): Wickens, Christopher D.
Department / Program: Psychology
Discipline: Psychology
Degree Granting Institution: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree: Ph.D.
Genre: Dissertation
Subject(s): Engineering, Aerospace Psychology, Experimental
Abstract: Two visual-spatial tasks were time-shared in an experiment to investigate the possibility of a compatibility mapping between the type of task (object-identification or motion-judgment) and the presentation location of the task in the visual field (central or peripheral). The attentional costs associated with time-sharing visual-spatial tasks were also addressed. The use of non-traditional flight displays to reduce visual overload in the cockpit was also explored. Three flight displays (central, peripheral, flow-field) were employed between subjects and the task types and locations were manipulated within groups. The results showed that (1) the type of task determined how quickly it was performed, while the location determines how accurately it was performed; (2) two peripheral tasks were found to interfere more than one central and one peripheral task, or two central tasks; (3) the flow-field display allowed for the most efficient time-sharing, suggesting further investigation into the use of non-traditional flight displays for the reduction of central visual overload in the cockpit. These results suggest that regardless of the task type, peripheral tasks are more demanding than central tasks. While limited evidence was found to support the compatibility hypothesis, no evidence was found to support the hypothesis that central and peripheral vision constitute separate resources.
Issue Date: 1990
Type: Text
Language: English
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/19537
Rights Information: Copyright 1990 Weinstein, Lisa F.
Date Available in IDEALS: 2011-05-07
Identifier in Online Catalog: AAI9021774
OCLC Identifier: (UMI)AAI9021774
 

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Item Statistics

  • Total Downloads: 0
  • Downloads this Month: 0
  • Downloads Today: 0

Browse

My Account

Information

Access Key