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Title:Delay models for intersections controlled by stop signs
Author(s):Al-Omari, Bashar Hani
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Benekohal, Rahim F.
Department / Program:Civil and Environmental Engineering
Discipline:Civil and Environmental Engineering
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Engineering, Civil
Operations Research
Abstract:This study divided the total delay into service and queue delay, and developed separate models for each component. Using a single model to estimate total delay is not appropriate, because the factors that affect the service delay are different from the factors that affect the queue delay.
The service delay is estimated empirically as a function of conflicting traffic volumes. This yields more accurate results than the gap acceptance concept. A strong correlation was found between the mean and the variance of the service time. Similar models were developed for both two- and all-way stop controlled intersections.
The queue delay is estimated using queuing theory for uncongested conditions and empirically for congested conditions. The M/G/1 model was found to be a good representative of the queue delay for two-way stop controlled intersections, and it is better than the M/M/1 model. On the other hand, the M/M/1 model was found to be a good representative of the queue delay for all-way stop controlled intersections, and it is better than the M/G/1 model. Three alternatives of empirical models were developed to estimate the queue delay as a function of the traffic intensity for congested conditions, and it was found that the exponential model is the best alternative for both two- and all-way stop controlled intersections.
The developed models were based on field data that included the subject approach service and queue times, and the intersection traffic volumes. The service and queue times were observed for a total of 3,814 vehicles at two-way stop, and 8,298 vehicles at all-way stop controlled intersections.
The final total delay models are very practical and use only two input variables: the arrival rate and conflicting traffic volumes. The developed models were compared with the 1994 HCM delay models, and it was found that the developed models are closer to the field data than the HCM models.
Issue Date:1996
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/20070
ISBN:9780591197310
Rights Information:Copyright 1996 Al-Omari, Bashar Hani
Date Available in IDEALS:2011-05-07
Identifier in Online Catalog:AAI9712190
OCLC Identifier:(UMI)AAI9712190


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