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Title:An investigation of the applicability of recent advances in computer technology to the development of a computer-based, random-access audio test of common criterion-referenced objectives in elementary music
Author(s):Venn, Michael Lavers
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Colwell, Richard J.
Department / Program:Education
Discipline:Education
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Education, Tests and Measurements
Education, Music
Education, Technology of
Abstract:The problem of this investigation was to determine the applicability of recent developments in computer technology to the development of a computer-based, random-access audio test of common criterion-referenced objectives in elementary music. A Macintosh SE/30 computer and HyperCard were used to access music from audio compact discs, store and play digitized music, and synthesize music.
Content validity was established for upper elementary school children by performing a content analysis of published music achievement tests, state music curricula, and elementary school general music texts. From this analysis four musical elements; melody, rhythm, texture, and tonality; were selected for measurement. Three formats were developed to try to solve common problems in music achievement testing as defined by an analysis of music testing literature and music testing manuals. The formats measured an examinee's skill at indicating if a change in the element had occurred, indicating the existence of a compositional device related to the element, and indicating the place in a musical selection where a change in the element occurred. Additionally, a format allowing examinees to compose a melody for a poem was devised.
The test was presented in an untimed format and examinees were given control of the playing of musical examples. Examinees communicated to the computer through the use of a mouse. An on-line help feature provided assistance in navigational aspects of the test and further explanation of the mechanics of playing music and answering test items. The test was computer scored.
The test was administered twice to thirty students in grades four through eleven who were told it was a musical game. The average administration time for the forty-three item test was forty-four minutes and thirty-two seconds. Test-retest reliability for the complete test was.79. Test-retest reliability for the formats ranged from.51 to.78. There was little relationship between amount of time spent in the test and score and the use of the on-line help feature and score. Relationship between correctness of response and the number of times musical examples were played varied by format and ranged from $-$.13 to.43. Relationship between item difficulty and the number of times musical examples were played also varied by format and ranged from $-$.05 to $-$.48. Current computer technology can improve the evaluation of music achievement.
Issue Date:1990
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/20662
Rights Information:Copyright 1990 Venn, Michael Lavers
Date Available in IDEALS:2011-05-07
Identifier in Online Catalog:AAI9114450
OCLC Identifier:(UMI)AAI9114450


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