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Title:Application of an instrument for evaluating child sexual abuse prevention programs
Author(s):Hanson, Amy Suzanne
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):DeStefano, Lizanne
Department / Program:Education, Guidance and Counseling
Education, Elementary
Psychology, Clinical
Sociology, Criminology and Penology
Discipline:Education, Guidance and Counseling
Education, Elementary
Psychology, Clinical
Sociology, Criminology and Penology
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Education, Guidance and Counseling
Education, Elementary
Psychology, Clinical
Sociology, Criminology and Penology
Abstract:The CSAPP (Child Sexual Abuse Prevention Program) evaluation instrument was applied to 12 child sexual abuse prevention programs currently on the market. This instrument incorporates the following criteria: (a) the appropriateness of the program format for the developmental level of the target audience; (b) the appropriateness of the child sexual abuse prevention concepts and definitions in the program for the target audience; (c) the appropriateness of the child sexual abuse prevention skills taught in the program for the target audience; (d) the appropriateness of the assessment measures used by the program; (e) the appropriateness of the program for the cultural background and gender of the target audience; (f) the extent of teacher and staff training provided; (g) the extent of parental and community involvement; (h) the extent of evaluation the program has undergone; and (i) the cost of the program. Results indicated that a majority of the programs incorporated a video. Also, almost all of the programs included some discussion activities. All of the programs taught concepts, however, only one program used the correct terminology for body parts. It was common for programs to teach children skills such as say "no" and tell, but it was uncommon for programs to teach skills through role-playing. It was also common to find programs incorporating more than one assessment measure. As a group, activity or comic books were more explicit in depicting the criterion of cultural background and gender. Finally, the area of evaluation still needs to be stressed. In conclusion, these results support the need for less new program development and more program revision, possibly by combining the best components from exemplar programs.
Issue Date:1996
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/21950
ISBN:9780591198874
Rights Information:Copyright 1996 Hanson, Amy Suzanne
Date Available in IDEALS:2011-05-07
Identifier in Online Catalog:AAI9712297
OCLC Identifier:(UMI)AAI9712297


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