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Title:A qualitative look at teacher satisfaction using journals
Author(s):Palaces, Charles Allan
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):McGreal, Thomas L.
Department / Program:Education
Discipline:Education
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ed.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Education, Sociology of
Education, Administration
Education, Elementary
Abstract:This study looks at the factors influencing teachers' satisfaction. A convenience sample of 13 teachers of Grades 3 through 8 kept journals from March 1 through April 30, 1991. Individual interview protocols were developed using the journals as the basis for follow-up questions and to give respondents an opportunity to respond in greater depth and to add satisfying experiences that they may not have mentioned during the journal-keeping period. A group interview where common themes were discussed constituted the third component of the research design.
Teacher satisfaction emanates from three sources: the teacher's relationships with her/his students, peers, and profession. Like most relationships, the key to satisfaction lies in the involvement of the participants.
Satisfaction for the teacher in relationships with the students depends upon student involvement. Lessons that were student-centered rather than teacher-centered tended to be greater sources of satisfaction for teachers. These lessons, in general, could be characterized as those which involved the students. Lessons that drew upon the students' creativity such as writing, "hands-on" activities in mathematics and science, and lessons involving group activities such as cooperative learning were repeatedly cited as sources of satisfaction.
Satisfaction for the teacher in relationships with her/his peers depends upon professional involvement with them. Sharing ideas and working collaboratively are frequently mentioned as sources of satisfaction.
Satisfaction also comes to the teacher from the profession itself. Recognition from being on district- or building-level committees, growth from staff development activities, and the freedom and autonomy of the classroom bring satisfaction to teachers.
Issue Date:1994
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/22058
Rights Information:Copyright 1994 Palaces, Charles Allan
Date Available in IDEALS:2011-05-07
Identifier in Online Catalog:AAI9416422
OCLC Identifier:(UMI)AAI9416422


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