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Title:The development of surface NMR-electrochemistry: A new in situ analytical probe to examine electrochemical interfaces
Author(s):Slezak, Philip John
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Wieckowski, Andrzej
Department / Program:Chemistry
Discipline:Chemistry
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Chemistry, Analytical
Abstract:Electrode potential-dependent NMR measurements of a $\sp{13}$C adsorbate on platinum were conducted for the first time. The method that I have developed has the capability of becoming a viable analytical technique in surface and solid-state electrochemistry. Using this method, carbon monoxide obtained from the decomposition of methanol was found to be bonded to a polycrystalline platinum electrode through linear and bridge configurations. Spin-spin and spin-lattice relaxation measurements were conducted to confirm the identification. Work completed previously by spectroelectrochemistry and gas-derived surface NMR measurements have been used for the data interpretation.
My thesis discusses the challenges of developing the surface NMR-electrochemistry method, as well as the solutions obtained to overcome them. Digitizing overload, RF penetration, vibrations, and the interfacing of electrochemistry to NMR are examined. Several second-generation probes, as well as computer simulations, were designed to expand the capabilities of this method. Analyses of a broad range of NMR spectra and cyclic voltammetry profiles of methanol-derived $\sp{13}$CO bonded to platinum are presented and discussed.
Issue Date:1992
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/22277
Rights Information:Copyright 1992 Slezak, Philip John
Date Available in IDEALS:2011-05-07
Identifier in Online Catalog:AAI9305698
OCLC Identifier:(UMI)AAI9305698


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