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Title:Relative efficacy of an ergonomic data entry system as measured by speed, accuracy, and perceived system protocol complexity by end users
Author(s):Thomalla, Anthony Alan
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Zaccaria, Joseph S.
Department / Program:Education
Discipline:Education
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Business Administration, General
Health Sciences, Occupational Health and Safety
Psychology, Industrial
Environmental Sciences
Computer Science
Abstract:This study explored the relative efficacy of Enterview as measured by speed, accuracy, and perceived complexity. Enterview was contrasted with Lotus 123. The effect of methods of data entry and acquisition were investigated. These were the independent variables. Speed, accuracy, and perceived complexity were dependent variables. A review of the literature explored the history of data entry conflicts and describes the development of Enterview.
Initial 1-tests displayed overall significant effects in the methods of entry and acquisition. These results, however, were assumed to be governed by "step effect". The source of a significant effect detected by a two-way MANOVA was explored by ANOVA procedures.
It was concluded that: (a) the method of entry has no effect on speed; (b) the method of entry has a significant effect on accuracy; (c) the method of entry has no effect on perceived complexity; (d) the method of acquisition has no effect on speed; (e) the method of acquisition has no effect on accuracy; (f) the method of acquisition has no effect on perceived complexity; (g) the interaction between methods has no effect on speed; (h) the interaction has no effect on accuracy; and (i) the interaction has no effect on perceived complexity.
Conclusions suggest that (a) data entry tasks performed with Enterview are more accurate than with Lotus 123; (b) Enterview is sometimes more convenient to use for data entry routines; and (c) end users perceive the complexity of Enterview and Lotus 123 as equal.
Issue Date:1991
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/22445
Rights Information:Copyright 1991 Thomalla, Anthony Alan
Date Available in IDEALS:2011-05-07
Identifier in Online Catalog:AAI9124498
OCLC Identifier:(UMI)AAI9124498


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