IDEALS Home University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign logo The Alma Mater The Main Quad

A study of learning and teaching of Kanji for nonnative learners of Japanese

Show full item record

Bookmark or cite this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/23070

Files in this item

File Description Format
PDF 8916259.pdf (3MB) Restricted to U of Illinois (no description provided) PDF
Title: A study of learning and teaching of Kanji for nonnative learners of Japanese
Author(s): Hatasa, Kazumi
Doctoral Committee Chair(s): Levin, James
Department / Program: Education
Discipline: Education
Degree Granting Institution: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree: Ph.D.
Genre: Dissertation
Subject(s): Education, Language and Literature
Abstract: Kanji (Chinese characters) present a serious obstacle of learners of Japanese as a foreign language. Finding an effective and efficient way of teaching them is essential. However, there has not been much research done to investigate how non-native learners of Japanese, in particular English speaking learners, learn these characters.Three studies were conducted. The first study was an experiment which addressed the question of whether pictographic characters are easier to learn than non-pictographic characters. The second study was a survey asking instructors of introductory Japanese language courses for various information about how existing Japanese programs teach Japanese orthography. The third study was a semester-long classroom experiment to investigate (a) effects of different orders of presenting Kanji, and (b) effects of pre-training which is designed to sensitize students to learning of Kanji.The first study showed that pictographic characters were in fact easier to learn and retain than non-pictographic characters, and that the use of mental imagery facilitated overall learning. The survey study provided various demographic information about existing programs and instructional methods being used. The third study failed to demonstrate the effects of alternative orders or pre-training. However, after the analysis of each Kanji introduced during the semester, the study showed (a) that Kanji which were more difficult in production were also more difficult in recognition, and (b) that the visual complexity (measured in stroke counts) was more closely associated with difficulty in production than recognition. Further, the study suggested that provided mnemonics could be an effective way to facilitate the learning of Kanji.
Issue Date: 1989
Type: Text
Language: English
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/23070
Rights Information: Copyright 1989 Hatasa, Kazumi
Date Available in IDEALS: 2011-05-07
Identifier in Online Catalog: AAI8916259
OCLC Identifier: (UMI)AAI8916259
 

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

Item Statistics

  • Total Downloads: 4
  • Downloads this Month: 0
  • Downloads Today: 0

Browse

My Account

Information

Access Key