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Title:The effects of wife's employment on family expenditure: Gross effects, work-related effects, and net income effects
Author(s):Yang, Se-Jeong
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Magrabi, Frances M.
Department / Program:Human and Community Development
Discipline:Human and Community Development
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Home Economics
Economics, General
Economics, Labor
Abstract:The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of wife's employment on family expenditure. Three effects of wife's employment were considered separately: gross effects, work-related effects, and net income effects. The sample consisted of 796 families from the 1987 Consumer Expenditure Survey. Multiple regression analysis was used to analyze the association between wife's employment and 18 expenditure categories.
The results indicate that total difference in amount of family expenditure between employed-wife families and non-employed-wife families (gross effects) was significant for the expenditures for food away from home, alcoholic beverages, shelter, domestic services, furnishings and equipment, apparel and related services, private transportation, personal care, and pensions and Social Security.
For work-related effects, positive effects were found on expenditures for domestic services, private transportation, personal care, and pensions and Social Security, whereas negative effects were found on expenditures for food at home, utilities, public transportation, health care, and reading materials.
The net income effects of wife's employment on expenditure were positive on food away from home, shelter, utilities, furnishings and equipment, apparel and related services, private transportation, public transportation, personal care, and pensions and Social Security.
Gross increase in total family expenditure averaged $3,053 and \$7,499 for part-time-employed-wife families and full-time-employed-wife families, respectively. The positive work-related expenditures for part-time-employed-wife families totaled $787, compared with \$2,017 for full-time-employed-wife families, about 10 percent of the wife's earnings. About a half of the wife's earnings were used for increases in family expenditure beyond work-related expenditure. Total net income effects for full-time-employed-wife families ($7,098) were double those for part-time-employed-wife families (\$3,545). More than 50 percent of the total net income effects consisted of the wife's contributions to shelter, private transportation, and pensions and Social Security.
Issue Date:1991
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/23356
Rights Information:Copyright 1991 Yang, Se-Jeong
Date Available in IDEALS:2011-05-07
Identifier in Online Catalog:AAI9136772
OCLC Identifier:(UMI)AAI9136772


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