Files in this item

FilesDescriptionFormat

application/pdf

application/pdf9712311.pdf (8MB)Restricted to U of Illinois
(no description provided)PDF

Description

Title:An examination of children's strategy responses to two types of conflict situations
Author(s):Hopmeyer, Andrea
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Asher, Steven R.
Department / Program:Psychology, Social
Psychology, Developmental
Discipline:Psychology, Social
Psychology, Developmental
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Psychology, Social
Psychology, Developmental
Abstract:The present study was designed to provide a more differential assessment of children's responses to interpersonal conflict. A distinction was made between two types of peer conflict situations: equal legitimacy conflict situations and rights infraction conflict situations. Equal legitimacy conflict situations involve disputes in which two children get into a conflict because they both get to a desired resource at the same time, they both want to use the resource and only one of them can use it first. Rights infraction conflict situations involve disputes in which one child has a prior claim to a desired resource because of prior possession, or because of ownership, and another child tries to take the resource from him or her. A sample of 629 fourth- and fifth-grade children completed a rating-scale sociometric measure, a behavioral nomination measure, and three questionnaire measures designed to assess their strategy responses, goal responses, and self-efficacy beliefs in equal legitimacy conflict situations and rights infraction conflict situations. Four major questions were addressed in the present study. Question 1: Are equal legitimacy conflict situations and rights infraction conflict situations psychologically distinct to children? Results indicated that the two types of conflict situations were seen as calling for different strategy responses and goal responses. The situations also evoked different self-efficacy beliefs. Question 2: How do highly aggressive and highly submissive children respond to the two types of conflict situations? Results indicated that children identified as highly aggressive by their peers and children identified as highly submissive by their peers appropriately modified their strategy responses, goal responses, and self-efficacy beliefs across the two types of conflict situations, but in a more limited way than average children. Question 3: Are children who do not modify their strategy responses to the conflict situations or modify them in a direction opposite that of most children found to be poorly-accepted by their peers? Results indicated that within the average and submissive behavior groups there was a tendency for children who did not appropriately modify their responses to be poorly-accepted by their peers. The relationship was less strong among the aggressive children. Question 4: What is the relative contribution of children's self-efficacy beliefs and goals in predicting their strategy responses to peer conflict situations? Results indicated that both children's self-efficacy beliefs and children's social goals added incrementally in predicting their strategy responses. Overall, the findings underscore the value of examining children's responses to different types of conflict situations.
Issue Date:1996
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/23803
ISBN:9780591199017
Rights Information:Copyright 1996 Hopmeyer, Andrea
Date Available in IDEALS:2011-05-07
Identifier in Online Catalog:AAI9712311
OCLC Identifier:(UMI)AAI9712311


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Item Statistics