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Title:Nonnative speakers' communication strategies in word searches from a conversation analytic perspective
Author(s):David, Virginia
Advisor(s):Koshik, Irene
Department / Program:Linguistics
Discipline:Teaching of English Sec Lang
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:M.A.
Genre:Thesis
Subject(s):communication strategies
searching for words
conversation analysis
circumlocution
language switch
language expertise
language learning
Abstract:This thesis uses conversation analysis methodology to analyze how nonnative speakers of English use communication strategies when searching for words. Language learners employ many communication strategies when searching for words, including language switch, appeals for assistance, gestures and circumlocution. In particular, the phenomena of language switch and circumlocution, as they occur in naturally occurring talk in combination with other communication strategies, are analyzed in depth in this thesis. The participants of this study were 9 graduate international students from a local university who speak Romance languages as their native language and 2 native speakers of English. Approximately 10 hours of naturally occurring talk were audio and video-recorded during informal get-togethers with the participants, in groups of two or three. The phenomenon of circumlocution was observed to occur together with other communication strategies, such as language switch and word coinage. Furthermore, it was used in collaboration among the participants in order to elicit the word being searched for. Similarly, language switch was also used together with other communication strategies, such as gestures. The issue of language expertise between the more and less proficient speakers of English and how the former collaborates with the latter when they share the same or similar native languages will also be discussed. This thesis concludes with a discussion of the implications for research and language learning and teaching.
Issue Date:2011-05-25
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/24233
Rights Information:
Copyright 2011 Virginia David
Date Available in IDEALS:2011-05-25
Date Deposited:2011-05


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