IDEALS Home University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign logo The Alma Mater The Main Quad

Personality and the healthy lifestyle as predictors of physical health: Can the healthy lifestyle be explained by personality?

Show full item record

Bookmark or cite this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/24269

Files in this item

File Description Format
PDF Edmonds_Grant.pdf (503KB) (no description provided) PDF
PDF gsoep_correlations.pdf (16KB) (no description provided) PDF
PDF hasci_correlations.pdf (17KB) (no description provided) PDF
PDF hrs_correlations.pdf (15KB) (no description provided) PDF
Title: Personality and the healthy lifestyle as predictors of physical health: Can the healthy lifestyle be explained by personality?
Author(s): Edmonds, Grant W.
Director of Research: Roberts, Brent W.
Doctoral Committee Chair(s): Roberts, Brent W.
Doctoral Committee Member(s): Fraley, R. C.; Larrison, Christopher R.; Mroczek, Daniel K.; Rounds, James
Department / Program: Psychology
Discipline: Psychology
Degree Granting Institution: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree: Ph.D.
Genre: Dissertation
Subject(s): The healthy lifestyle Personality Big five Mediation Individual differences Healthy user Bias Structural equation modeling (SEM) Traits
Abstract: In health and epidemiological research, the Healthy Lifestyle (HLS) is often invoked as an explanation for inconsistent effects. Modifiable components of the HLS are advocated as a panacea for the most common threats to public health. Biases resulting from the HLS are theorized to result from covariance among its components. This covariance has not yet been formally modeled. Furthermore, no mechanism has been proposed to explain this covariance among these factors. Using three large nationally representative samples, I evaluated the HLS as a latent variable. Using structural equation modeling (SEM) I evaluated the degree to which the shared variance of HLS components is accounted for by personality traits, and tested the HLS as a mediator of the personality health relationship. Across all three samples, the HLS fits well as a latent variable, is partially accounted for by personality traits, and mediates the effects of personality traits on health. In all cases personality traits have direct effects on health independent of the HLS. These results suggest that the utility of personality traits as predictors of health exceeds that provided by commonly used lifestyle predictors.
Issue Date: 2011-05-25
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/24269
Rights Information: Copyright 2011 Grant W. Edmonds
Date Available in IDEALS: 2011-05-25
Date Deposited: 2011-05
 

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

Item Statistics

  • Total Downloads: 605
  • Downloads this Month: 5
  • Downloads Today: 0

Browse

My Account

Information

Access Key