IDEALS Home University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign logo The Alma Mater The Main Quad

Teaching English for the first time: anxiety among Japanese elementary-school teachers

Show full item record

Bookmark or cite this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/24324

Files in this item

File Description Format
PDF Machida_Tomohisa.pdf (821KB) (no description provided) PDF
Title: Teaching English for the first time: anxiety among Japanese elementary-school teachers
Author(s): Machida, Tomohisa
Director of Research: Walsh, Daniel J.
Doctoral Committee Chair(s): Walsh, Daniel J.
Doctoral Committee Member(s): Golato, Peter S.; Sadler, Randall W.; Willis, Arlette I.; Bishop, Hugh
Department / Program: Curriculum and Instruction
Discipline: Elementary Education
Degree Granting Institution: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree: Ph.D.
Genre: Dissertation
Subject(s): English language education anxiety elementary school teacher
Abstract: English language education officially started in Japanese elementary schools in 2009. Homeroom teachers, whether experienced or not, are responsible for teaching the subject to students. Additionally, teachers are often required to team-teach with a native English speaker. It is plausible that Japanese teachers are anxious about teaching English. This study investigated Japanese teachers’ English anxiety and its sources. Teachers’ anxiety-coping strategies were also examined. English anxiety includes (a) anxiety about a teacher’s own English proficiency and (b) anxiety about teaching English. There were 133 Japanese elementary school teachers participating in the present study, as well one native English teacher, and three in-service teacher trainers. The Teacher Foreign Language Anxiety Scale (Horwitz, 2008), the Situational Teaching Anxiety Scale, follow-up interviews, and a survey were used in this study. Data showed that 77.4% of teachers were anxious about their own English proficiency, and 90.2% of them were anxious about teaching English. The sources of anxiety included lack of experience and training for teaching English and lack of confidence in English communication. Teachers experienced two phases of anxiety, depending on their English teaching experience. The study also has educational implications for less-experienced teachers who have to understand that there are two phases of anxiety. Furthermore, support by the city board of education is important for diminishing teachers’ anxiety.
Issue Date: 2011-05-25
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/24324
Rights Information: Copyright 2011 Tomohisa Machida
Date Available in IDEALS: 2011-05-25
Date Deposited: 2011-05
 

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show full item record

Item Statistics

  • Total Downloads: 429
  • Downloads this Month: 9
  • Downloads Today: 0

Browse

My Account

Information

Access Key