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Title:Children's cross-ethnicity relations in elementary schools: concurrent and prospective associations between ethnic segregation and social status
Author(s):Wilson, Travis M.
Director of Research:Rodkin, Philip C.
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Rodkin, Philip C.
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Ryan, Allison M.; Anderson, Carolyn J.; Cohen, Dov; Tynes, Brendesha
Department / Program:Educational Psychology
Discipline:Educational Psychology
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Children's inter-group peer relations
ethnic segregation and social status
Abstract:This longitudinal study inquired into African American (n = 402) and European American (n = 311) children’s patterns of peer group segregation, cross-ethnicity dislike, and social status in 4th and 5th grade classrooms. Primary study questions asked whether ethnic segregation is concurrently (i.e., Fall) and/or prospectively (i.e., Fall to Spring) associated with social preference and perceived popularity as viewed by same- and cross-ethnicity classmates. African Americans, as compared to European Americans, had more segregated peer groups yet evidenced less cross-ethnicity dislike. Compelling evidence indicated that (a) segregation has social costs and social benefits for both ethnic groups and (b) segregation is a mechanism for change in social status. In the Fall, African American children’s segregation was positively associated with same-ethnicity social preference and perceived popularity and with cross-ethnicity perceived popularity, but was negatively associated with cross-ethnicity social preference; European American children’s segregation was positively associated with same-ethnicity social preference but was negatively associated with cross-ethnicity social preference and perceived popularity. Moreover, for African American children, Fall segregation predicted increases in same-ethnicity social preference and perceived popularity and in cross-ethnicity perceived popularity, but predicted declines in cross-ethnicity social preference. For European American children, Fall segregation predicted declines in cross-ethnicity social preference, but was unrelated to changes in other status constructs. Discussion elaborates on processes of intergroup relations and the complexities of fostering positive cross-ethnicity relationships in elementary classrooms.
Issue Date:2011-05-25
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/24390
Rights Information:
Copyright 2011 Travis M. Wilson
Date Available in IDEALS:2011-05-25
2013-05-26
Date Deposited:2011-05


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