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Note: This is a student project from a course affiliated with the Ethnography of the University Initiative. EUI supports faculty development of courses in which students conduct original research on their university, and encourages students to think about colleges and universities in relation to their communities and within larger national and global contexts.

Cultural Houses and clubs: Help or Hindrance?

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Title: Cultural Houses and clubs: Help or Hindrance?
Author(s): Anonymous
Subject(s): cultural houses clubs university
Abstract: Cultural houses and cultural specific clubs are ways that students can meet people of similar backgrounds and or interests; which allows them to feel more comfortable at the University. It is possible that Cultural houses, although not directly, promote self-segregation. It is also important to examine the educational effects of cultural groups on students. After collecting data; we were able to find that students did in fact socialize with people outside their cultural group. We also found that students routinely use the academic resources available to them when taking exams. We can infer from the evidence that Cultural groups do in fact promote diversity and provide means for students to seek opportunities to meet with other cultural groups. Also students within Cultural groups are given many academic resources to help them achieve higher grades through research and study tools.
Issue Date: 2011-08
Series/Report: RHET105 Section B4C3 (Race and Ethnicity at UIUC)Professor Thomas HerakovichIn this Rhetoric 105 class students were expected to: 1. develop skills as readers and writers by reading and writing sophisticated prose, including ethnographic papers/books/articles and research papers/journals/books/articles; 2. experience writing as a process of revision and collaboration, where longer, more complex pieces grow out of earlier work—ideas, collaboration, field notes, summaries, abstracts, data tables, charts, and graphs; 3. reflect and analyze conventional and personal reading and writing processes as readers and writers while reading, writing about, and discussing the texts of the course: published work, peers’ work, as well as personal work; 4. become more practiced at using writing as a means of investigation, writing as an early strategy for discovering and for answering questions, thus challenging the commonplace belief that all writing is designed to prove something once and for all; 5. identify and connect the intellectual and philosophical insights that arise when reading and writing personal and ethnographic essays, to the contexts of our day to day lives; 6. accomplish 1-5 above within a course context dedicated to investigating Race and Ethnicity here at UIUC and elsewhere through theorizing and practicing the art of writing and critiquing personal, ethnographic, academic papers, and various forms of data presentation.
Genre: Essay
Type: Text
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/25938
Date Available in IDEALS: 2011-08-16
 

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Student Communities and Culture
    The university offers an extraordinary opportunity to study and document student communities, life, and culture. This collection includes research on the activities, clubs, and durable social networks that comprise sometimes the greater portion of the university experience for students.

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