Files in this item

FilesDescriptionFormat

application/pdf

application/pdfAhn_Hai-Jeong.pdf (404kB)
(no description provided)PDF

Description

Title:Longitudinal relationships between children's popularity and social behaviors: the effects of friendship network structures and teacher's knowledge of classroom peer ecologies
Author(s):Ahn, Hai-Jeong
Director of Research:Rodkin, Philip C.
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Rodkin, Philip C.
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Anderson, Carolyn J.; Espelage, Dorothy L.; Gest, Scott D.; Ryan, Allison M.
Department / Program:Educational Psychology
Discipline:Educational Psychology
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Popularity
Aggression
Prosociality
Friendship Network Structures
Teacher Knowledge of Peer Ecology
Multilevel Analysis
Abstract:This study investigated the effects of classroom friendship network structures (density and centralization) and teacher knowledge of children’s peer ecology (peer groups, aggression, and peer status) in their classrooms on longitudinal relationships between social behaviors and popularity. Longitudinal multilevel analyses with two-time points (fall and spring) were conducted on a sample of 901 fourth- and fifth-graders from 46 classrooms. At the individual level, prior aggression was a positive predictor of later perceived popularity, and prosociality increasingly affected social preference over time. Density increased the mean level of perceived popularity and social preference, and teacher knowledge of aggression increased the mean level of social preference. However, teacher knowledge of peer status decreased the mean level of perceived popularity over time. The perceived popularity of aggressive students varied greatly acorss classrooms. Aggressive students increased their perceived popularity over time in classroooms with low friendship density and low teacher knowledge of aggression. The social preference of aggressive and prosocial students was also moderated by friendship density and teacher knowledge of peer status, respectively. Implicatons for classroom management are discussed.
Issue Date:2011-08-25
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/26122
Rights Information:Copyright 2011 Hai-Jeong Ahn
Date Available in IDEALS:2011-08-25
Date Deposited:2011-08


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Item Statistics