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Racial differences in job satisfaction : testing four common explanations / BEBR No. 533

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Title: Racial differences in job satisfaction : testing four common explanations / BEBR No. 533
Author(s): Moch, Michael K., 1944-
Contributor(s): University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. College of Commerce and Business Administration.
Subject(s): Job satisfaction. African Americans -- Employment. Mexican Americans -- Employment.
Issue Date: De 8 1978
Publisher: [Urbana, Ill.] : College of Commerce and Business Administration, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,
Series/Report: Faculty working papers ; no. 533
Type: Text
Language: English
Description: Includes bibliographical references (p. 23-25)."Several studies have documented differential job satisfaction by race. This paper combines structural, cultural, social and social psychological factors in an attempt to explain some of these differences. It was found that these factors account for a modest amount of the differences in satisfaction for black and white employees. Differential work assignments account for some of this difference. The importance employees place on interpersonal relations and the degree to which they are integrated into or isolated from friendship relationships also have an impact. Although there is a significant difference between races in their vertical position in the organization, this diffference does not acount for differential job satisfaction, net of the other factors. Although these factors help explain some of the differential job satisfaction between Blacks and Whites, they do not account for significantly higher levels of job satisfaction reported by Mexican Americans. To explain some of this difference, employees' perceived relative deprivation was considered. Controlling for other factors, however, relative deprivation was not significantly associated with job satisfaction. It is concluded that other explanations must be sought to explain differential job satisfaction by race and that there are different determinants for members of different races."
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/26815
Rights Information: In copyright. Digitized with permission of the University of Illinois Board of Trustees. Contact digicc@library.illinois.edu for information.Copyright De 8 1978 Board of Trustees University of Illinois.
Date Available in IDEALS: 2011-09-15
Has Version(s): http://hdl.handle.net/10111/UIUCOCA:racialdifference533moch http://www.archive.org/details/racialdifference533moch
Identifier in Online Catalog: 323940
OCLC Identifier: (OCoLC)ocm05134945
 

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