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Title: Identifying factors for farmers to adopt new farming techniques
Author(s): Pearcy, Ryan
Advisor(s): Anderson, James C., II
Department / Program: Human & Community Development
Discipline: Agricultural Education
Degree Granting Institution: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree: M.S.
Genre: Masters
Subject(s): Farmer Learning Techniques
Motivation for Adoption
Abstract: Farming in the United States is a triumph that is unique in world history. While not the first society to actively strive to educate farmers, American agriculturalists have benefitted from a well-constructed extension network coupled with a large information laden agriculture industrial base. When one considers the ever evolving agricultural technology and practices that are constructed at an even faster rate, there is a continuing need to understand what truly influences a farmer to augment their current practices. Research was conducted through mailings amongst Midwestern and Northeastern farmers in order to gauge the state of American farmer’s influences for adoption. Sixty-three farmers were surveyed on their educational levels as well as learning preferences to glean which instructional strategies may be considered most beneficial to knowledge acquisition. Results indicated that online and other media learning is growing especially in younger generations. In addition, social learning through the dissemination of information from friends and family was still a powerful method that was utilized by the group of farmers. Also, respondents reported that economic justification, congruency with current practices, enjoyment, family acceptance, and availability of a local knowledgeable farmer were the most influential factors in adopting new practices. These findings have implications for extension educators in understanding what avenues one can take to encourage farming practice adoption or modification.
Issue Date: 2012-02-01
Genre: thesis
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/29576
Rights Information: Copyright 2011 Ryan Pearcy
Date Available in IDEALS: 2012-02-01
2014-02-01
Date Deposited: 2011-12


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