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Title:Soft elasticity is not necessary for striping in nematic elastomers
Author(s):Fried, Eliot; Sellers, Shaun
Abstract:The occurrence of striped domains in stretched nematic elastomers has been suggested as evidence for soft elasticity. Conversely, the neo-classical model of Bladon, Terentjev and Warner, which displays soft elasticity, predicts striping. Here we show that the postulated director rotations and shears in the domain regions are also predicted by more general constitutive models that do not involve any notion of softness. Striping in nematic elastomers may therefore be a more general phenomena that is not necessarily an indication of soft elasticity. Furthermore, constitutive models more general than the neo-classical model may also explain the behavior of some nematic elastomers that do not appear to exhibit striping.
Issue Date:2005-09
Publisher:Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (UIUC)
Series/Report:TAM Reports 1073, (2005)
Genre:Technical Report
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/331
ISSN:0073-5264
Publication Status:published or submitted for publication
Peer Reviewed:is peer reviewed
Date Available in IDEALS:2007-03-09
Is Version Of:Published as: Eliot Fried and Shaun Sellers. Soft elasticity is not necessary for striping in nematic elastomers. Journal of Applied Physics, Vol. 100, No. 4, 2006, pp. 043521 and may be found at: http://link.aip.org/link/?jap/100/043521. DOI: 10.1063/1.2234824. Copyright 2006 American Institute of Physics. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the American Institute of Physics.


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  • Technical Reports - Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (TAM)
    TAM technical reports include manuscripts intended for publication, theses judged to have general interest, notes prepared for short courses, symposia compiled from outstanding undergraduate projects, and reports prepared for research-sponsoring agencies.

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