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“Pa’ tra’ ni pa’ coger impulso”: parental influences on the education journey of low-income Latino males who “made it” to a four-year university

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Title: “Pa’ tra’ ni pa’ coger impulso”: parental influences on the education journey of low-income Latino males who “made it” to a four-year university
Author(s): Cruz-Santiago, Michelle
Director of Research: Bishop, Ann Peterson
Doctoral Committee Chair(s): Aber, Mark S.
Doctoral Committee Member(s): Bishop, Ann Peterson; Darder, Antonia; Raffaelli, Marcela; Wiley, Angela R.
Department / Program: Psychology
Discipline: Psychology
Degree Granting Institution: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree: Ph.D.
Genre: Dissertation
Subject(s): Latino Males Academic Resilience Parent Involvement Highschool-to-College
Abstract: Latino males from low-income backgrounds have one of the highest high school dropout rates and lowest college enrollment and graduation rates in the United States. Like many disadvantaged students, low-income Latino males face multi-systemic obstacles that limit them from realizing their full potential in the current education system. Yet, despite the odds against them, many successfully navigate the education pipeline. How do they do it, and in what ways do their families influence their educational journeys? As part of a larger study on academic resilience, this investigation examines the role of parents in the educational success of low-income Latino men. Eleven men in their first-year at a four-year university participated in three individual interviews and one focus group interview. Three parental influences emerged: 1) Parents’ expressed commitment to their children’s education; 2) Parents as role models and sources of motivation; and 3) Interdependent family relationships. These results highlight the various ways that low-income Latino parents – often overworked and undereducated themselves – can propel, rather than hinder, academic success among their children. This work contributes to the emerging body of research that challenge deficit-based, victim-blaming conceptualizations of low-income Latino parents and their involvement in their children’s education.
Issue Date: 2012-09-18
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/34545
Rights Information: Copyright 2012 Michelle Cruz-Santiago
Date Available in IDEALS: 2012-09-18
Date Deposited: 2012-08
 

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