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Prefrontal cortical organization of executive function in depression and comorbid anxiety

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Title: Prefrontal cortical organization of executive function in depression and comorbid anxiety
Author(s): Warren, Stacie
Director of Research: Miller, Gregory A.
Doctoral Committee Chair(s): Heller, Wendy
Doctoral Committee Member(s): Miller, Gregory A.; Berenbaum, Howard; Kramer, Arthur F.; Fabiani, Monica
Department / Program: Psychology
Discipline: Psychology
Degree Granting Institution: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree: Ph.D.
Genre: Dissertation
Subject(s): executive function depression anxiety factor analysis structural equation modeling (SEM) Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)
Abstract: Anxiety and depression are prevalent forms of psychopathology and are associated with significant impairment in multiple areas of life, including occupational, educational, and social functioning. In addition to their affective symptoms, anxiety and depression are associated with significant cognitive disruptions, yet our understanding of these impairments and their mechanisms is very limited. In particular, such cognitive deficits could be accounted for by fundamental deficits in specific aspects of executive function (EF), processes that are imperative for adaptive emotion regulation. Determining specific EF impairments in anxiety and depression has the potential to provide a mechanistic account of the development and maintenance of these highly comorbid disorders. Thus, understanding EF in an integrated manner across psychological and neurobiological levels is extremely relevant to mental health. The present dissertation aims to advance these literatures by identifying a behavioral model of EF impairment in anxiety and depression, and its associated neural correlates. Brain regions associated with implementing inhibition, a specific EF component of this model, are identified. The moderating effects of anxiety and depression on brain activity associated with inhibition-related functions are examined.
Issue Date: 2012-09-18
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/34570
Rights Information: Copyright 2012 Stacie Warren
Date Available in IDEALS: 2012-09-18
Date Deposited: 2012-08
 

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