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Title:Collateral damage: un-intended brand-association effects of American in-language Hispanic advertising on the non-Spanish speaking consumer
Author(s):Carmona Cortes, Enrique
Advisor(s):Duff, Brittany
Department / Program:Advertising
Discipline:Advertising
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:M.S.
Genre:Thesis
Subject(s):in-language
inlanguage
Advertising
brand
brand image
group categorization
brand associations
ethnic advertising
ethnic targetting
in-group
ingroup
out-group
outgroup
country
multi-cultural
Spanish
Latino
Hispanic
television advertisements
Group Theory
categorization
language
language prevalence
bi-lingual
Abstract:This thesis explores language as an ethnic ad-targeting cue in the context of group categorization. A sample of non-Spanish speaking Americans was exposed to TV advertisements for known American brands. Conditions manipulated ad language (English or Spanish) and the prevalence of language in the ad (High or low prevalence). Results showed that when presented with an ad in Spanish, non-Spanish speaking Americans associated the advertised brand less with the US. Contrary to industry assumptions, this finding supports the notion that when brands increase their likelihood of association to a particular kind of specific consumer group (such as the case of Ethnic advertising), they might be doing so at the cost of partial disassociation to a different kind of consumer. The present study offers important implications to professionals attempting to advertise mainstream brands to ethnic groups and in particular, to professionals advertising American brands to Hispanic consumers.
Issue Date:2013-05-24
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/44182
Rights Information:Copyright 2013 Enrique Carmona Cortes
Date Available in IDEALS:2013-05-24
Date Deposited:2013-05


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