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Title:Lessons Learned About Access to Government Information After World War II Can Be Applied After September 11
Author(s):Hogenboom, Karen
Subject(s):Government Information
Government Secrecy
Abstract:The cost of unrestricted dissemination of government information to Americans' safety and security has been a topic of heated debate since September 11, 2001. The risks of dissemination seem to have skyrocketed in this age of terrorist attacks. However, the United States faced similar risks after World War II, when the secret of the atom bomb required close protection. Congress can learn from the process that the U.S. government went through to pass the Atomic Energy Act of 1946 [Atomic Energy Act of 1946. Pub. L. No. 79-585, 60 Stat. 755] during a similar time of national stress and fear and work to pass laws regulating the dissemination of information to the public. In the absence of legislative guidance, agencies have been left to restrict information as they think is best, with inconsistent and disastrous results.
Issue Date:2008
Publisher:Elsevier
Citation Info:Hogenboom, Karen. “Lessons Learned About Access to Government Information After World War II Can Be Applied After September 11.” Government Information Quarterly 25: 90-103 (2008).
Genre:Article
Type:Text
Language:English
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/45671
DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.giq.2007.08.002
Publication Status:published or submitted for publication
Peer Reviewed:is peer reviewed
Rights Information:copyright 2008 Elsevier
Date Available in IDEALS:2013-08-22


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