Miscellaneous Publications - Illinois State Water Survey

 
Generally short and convey research results quickly to user groups. Includes some nontechnical brochures and booklets. ISWS Technical Letters 1-27 (published 1959-1978) were also assigned Miscellaneous Publication numbers and can be found in this collection.

The following ISWS Miscellaneous Publications are not available in IDEALS; details are here
MP-001
MP-002
MP-007 full text in HathiTrust
MP-008 full text in HathiTrust
MP-055
MP-057
MP-058
MP-063
MP-064
MP-067
MP-068
MP-071
MP-074
MP-075
MP-079
MP-082
MP-083
MP-090 full text in HathiTrust
MP-092
MP-097 full text in HathiTrust
MP-099 full text on publisher website
MP-100
MP-106
MP-166 full text in HathiTrust

The following Miscellaneous Report numbers were never assigned:
MP-145 (acc. to ISWS Publications Catalog, 1995, p. 39, "Does not exist")
MP-146 (acc. to ISWS Publications Catalog, 1995, p. 39, "Does not exist")
MP-170
MP-180
MP-183

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  • (Illinois State Water Survey, 1984-07)

    application/pdf

    application/pdfPDF (7MB)
  • Illinois State Water Survey (Illinois State Water Survey, 1982-05)
    Discusses key findings over 30 years of radar detection of thunderstorms, hail, tornadoes, and heavy rains in Illinois by the Illinois State Water Survey.

    application/pdf

    application/pdfPDF (595kB)
  • Illinois State Water Survey (Illinois State Water Survey, 1971-11)
    Considers concentrations of eight minor elements (cadmium, chromium, copper, lithium, lead, nickel, strontium, and zinc) observed in samples taken from Illinois streams 1966-1971.

    application/pdf

    application/pdfPDF (9MB)
  • Ackermann, William C. (Illinois State Water Survey, 1971-03)
    Provides information on the extent of lakes and similar bodies of water in Illinois and how evaporation is measured.

    application/pdf

    application/pdfPDF (2MB)
  • Gatz, Donald F.; Changnon, Stanley A., Jr. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL, 1976-11)
    Climate was the most important factor in producing the Great Lakes we have today. Through glacial action during the Pleistocene Epoch, the surface topography, shape, and depth of Lake Michigan were determined. Today the ...

    application/pdf

    application/pdfPDF (11MB)

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