Library Trends 61 (4) Spring 2013: The Impact of Gaming on Libraries

 

Library Trends 61 (4) Spring 2013: The Impact of Gaming on Libraries (Restricted). Edited by Scott Nicholson.

The goal of this special issue is to take a close look at different library gaming programs. Authors who wrote for the issue were challenged to explore the impact of gaming programs in their libraries. In each of the articles, the author presents a different way of bringing gaming into the library and then explores the impact of these library gaming programs. Taken as a group, these articles demonstrate the wide variety of gaming possibilities that are available to libraries. No matter the age of the patrons, the budget of the library, or the space available, there are creative ways that gaming can be used to bring people together to collaborate or compete and help them improve their relationships with communities, family, and each other. Gaming can improve understanding of other topics and kindle interests in related library services. Most importantly, libraries that engage in gaming programs are demonstrating their awareness of gaming as a new form of media that is as important and relevant as books, magazines, music, and film.


Library Trends (ISSN 0024-2594) is an essential tool for librarians and educators alike. Each issue thoroughly explores a current topic of interest in professional librarianship and includes practical applications, thorough analyses, and literature reviews. The journal is published quarterly for the Graduate School of Library and Information Science by The Johns Hopkins University Press. For subscription information, call 800-548-1784 (410-516-6987 outside the U.S. and Canada), email jlorder [at] jhupress.jhu.edu, or visit www.press.jhu.edu/journals

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  • Powell, Annmarie (Johns Hopkins University Press and the Graduate School of Library and Information Science. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2013)
    Play is a well-documented educational tool, but one that has begun to decline in schools and early childhood education due to the increased pressure for cognitive-based school readiness programs. Play such as pretend ...

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  • Copeland, Teresa; Henderson, Brenda; Mayer, Brian; Nicholson, Scott (Johns Hopkins University Press and the Graduate School of Library and Information Science. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2013)
    Three school library staff members explore how they have used tabletop games in different school library settings. Teresa Copeland (Tesseract School, Paradise Valley, Arizona, USA) explores how tabletop and role-playing ...

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  • Broussard, Mary J. Snider (Johns Hopkins University Press and the Graduate School of Library and Information Science. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2013)
    This article describes how an annual Harry Potter Night program fits into a college library’s mission. The literature shows college and university libraries are already accustomed to supporting their campus communities’ ...

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  • Vanden Elzen, Angela M.; Roush, Jacob (Johns Hopkins University Press and the Graduate School of Library and Information Science. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2013)
    Academic libraries not only need to focus on instructing students about library resources but also need to actively reach out to them. One way to accomplish this is to integrate gaming into library programming and ...

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  • Werner, Kat (Johns Hopkins University Press and the Graduate School of Library and Information Science. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2013)
    Children and teens are living in an increasingly digital world, and libraries struggle with ways to continue to be relevant to the younger generation. One way libraries can bring children and teen patrons in the doors ...

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