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Title:The influence of pediatric concussion on cognitive control and neuroelectric function
Author(s):Moore, Robert
Director of Research:Hillman, Charles H.
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Hillman, Charles H.
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Broglio, Steven P.; Federmeier, Kara D.; Sosnoff, Jacob J.
Department / Program:Kinesiology & Community Health
Discipline:Kinesiology
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Pediatric Concussion
Neurocognition
Event related potentials (ERPs)
Abstract:The increasing prevalence of concussive injuries in the public consciousness has engendered increased research efforts in clinical and laboratory settings dedicated to understanding the nature and duration of neurocognitive deficits stemming from concussive injuries. The vast majority of the efforts, however, have been dedicated to understanding the consequences of concussive injuries in adult populations, with pediatric populations being oft neglected. Accordingly, the aim of this investigation is to examine the influence of pediatric concussion on neurocognition. Using a between-participants design, measures of cognitive control and event-related potentials and were assessed in children with and without a history of concussion. Children with a history of concussion evidenced a myriad of deficits relative demographically matched control children during neuropsychological and experimental task performance. On the behavioral level, children with a history of concussion exhibited deficits in (f) intelligence, attention, working memory, interference/inhibitory control and the flexible control of behavior. Further, children with a history of concussion exhibited a multitude of neuroelectric alterations suggestive of multidimensional deficits in attentional processing, action /conflict monitoring and resolution and error awareness. Together the current results point to pervasive neurocognitive deficits stemming from pediatric concussion and suggest further comprehensive evaluations of pediatric concussion are warranted.
Issue Date:2014-05-30
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/49745
Rights Information:Copyright 2014 Robert Moore
Date Available in IDEALS:2014-05-30
2016-09-22
Date Deposited:2014-05


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