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Title:Exploring sources of perceived social support and attachment insecurity that significantly predict mental health among a group of college students
Author(s):Wang, Qian
Director of Research:Strauser, David R.
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Strauser, David R.
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Alston, Reginald J.; Chiu, Chung-Yi; Chan, Fong
Department / Program:Kinesiology & Community Health
Discipline:Community Health
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Attachment Insecurity
Perceived Social Support
College Student Mental Health
Abstract:This study examined sources of perceived social support and attachment insecurity that were significant predictors of mental health in a group of college students. 407 undergraduate students (mean age = 20.25 years) enrolled in a 200-level course in a large Midwestern university volunteered to complete self-reported questionnaires. Pearson correlations were calculated for all variables, MANOVA, ANOVA, and hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted. Sources of perceived social support and attachment insecurity that significantly predicted mental health differed across genders, with females reporting more perceived social support from family, friends, and significant others, and males reporting more attachment anxiety as well as avoidance. In regards to sources of perceived social support, support from family was the most significant predictor of males’ mental health, whereas support from friends was the most significant predictor of females’ mental health. In regards to attachment insecurity, avoidance with father emerged as the most significant predictor of males’ mental health, whereas avoidance with mother, anxiety with dating partner and best friends were the most significant predictors of females’ mental health. Incremental effects of perceived social support on mental health were also explored. For male students, perceived social support did not have any additional incremental effects on mental health after controlling for attachment. For female students, perceived support from friends had a small but significant amount of additional effects on mental health after controlling for attachment. Findings of this study indicate that male and female college students’ mental wellbeing were influenced by distinctive close relationships.
Issue Date:2014-09-16
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/50451
Rights Information:Copyright 2014 Qian Wang
Date Available in IDEALS:2014-09-16
2016-09-22
Date Deposited:2014-08


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