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Title:Suffering in the shadows: "undocumented" Latin American immigrants, inequality, embodiment and health
Author(s):Mantilla, Bryanna
Director of Research:Liao, Tim F.
Doctoral Committee Chair(s):Liao, Tim F.
Doctoral Committee Member(s):Viruell-Fuentes, Edna; Zerai, Assata; McDermott, Monica
Department / Program:Sociology
Discipline:Sociology
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):undocumented
Latin American
Latino
Latina
Hispanic
immigrant
migrant
health
embodiment
social determinants of health
structural violence
inequality
qualitative
illegal
sociology
Latino Studies
racialization
immigration
Washington DC
intersectionality
theory
immigration policy
unauthorized
mental health
physical health
suffering
Abstract:This study utilizes the idea of embodiment to examine the social processes that “undocumented” Latin American migrants undergo and how these social processes affect their health. Embodiment refers to how our bodies and minds literally incorporate, from conception to death, the material and social world in which we live (Krieger, 2001b). The study uses a critical intersectional lens and an adapted grounded theory approach to analyze 31 original qualitative in-depth interviews with nationally diverse “undocumented” Latin American migrants from the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area in order to create a theoretical framework that addresses: (1) how “undocumented” Latin American migrants experience structural violence and inequality through various pathways (e.g. labor exploitation, detention and deportation, gender based violence, racialized nativism, discrimination and othering, fragmentation of social ties, and internalized suffering), which results in differential exposure and susceptibility to poor health outcomes; (2) how “undocumented” Latino/a migrants respond to and contend with inequality; and (3) how structural violence and inequality becomes deleterious physical and mental health outcomes through multilevel pathways of embodiment.
Issue Date:2014-09-16
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/50504
Rights Information:Copyright 2014 Bryanna Mantilla
Date Available in IDEALS:2014-09-16
Date Deposited:2014-08


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