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Title:School level predictors of homophobic name-calling & sexual harassment victimization/perpetration among middle school youth
Author(s):Rinehart, Sarah
Advisor(s):Espelage, Dorothy L.
Department / Program:Educational Psychology
Discipline:Educational Psychology
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:M.S.
Genre:Thesis
Subject(s):homophobic name-calling
sexual harassment
school climate
multilevel modeling
middle school
teacher
Abstract:Using multi-informant, multilevel modeling, this study examines the association between teacher and staff perceptions of school environment and student self-reports of homophobic name-calling perpetration and victimization as well as sexual harassment perpetration and victimization. Surveys were conducted with 1,447 teachers and staff and 3,616 6th grade students across 36 middle schools in the Midwest. Bivariate associations between school-level and student self-reports revealed that when teachers perceive their schools as being committed to bullying prevention, students reported less homophobic name-calling perpetration, sexual harassment perpetration, and sexual harassment victimization. Further, when adults reported more positive interactions between staff and students in their school, students endorsed lower levels of homophobic name-calling perpetration and victimization and less sexual harassment perpetration. Additionally, higher teacher/staff reported gender equity or intolerance of sexual harassment at the school level was correlated with less student reported homophobic name- calling perpetration and victimization and sexual harassment perpetration. In a model with all school environment scales entered together, school commitment to prevent bullying was associated with less sexual harassment perpetration; in addition, higher perceived gender equity and intolerance of sexual harassment at the school level was associated with fewer reported experiences of homophobic name-calling perpetration and victimization and sexual harassment perpetration. We conclude that efforts to address gendered harassment should include support from the school administration and professional development opportunities for all teachers and staff. Adults in the school should create a culture that is intolerant of sexual harassment and supports equality between the girls and boys in the school.
Issue Date:2014-09-16
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/50755
Rights Information:Copyright 2014 Sarah Rinehart
Date Available in IDEALS:2014-09-16
Date Deposited:2014-08


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