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Title:Affective and Cognitive Goals and Objectives in Individualized Education Programs for Mildly Handicapped Students
Author(s):Feinn, Jonathan Herbert
Department / Program:Education
Discipline:Education
Degree Granting Institution:University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree:Ph.D.
Genre:Dissertation
Subject(s):Education, Special
Abstract:This study's purpose was to investigate the manner in which affect and cognition are reflected in planning for mildly handicapped students. The major questions pursued were whether special education teachers included affective goals and objectives on their IEPs and whether the goals and objectives primarily addressed classroom management or the personal development of the learner. The investigation also sought to demonstrate whether cognitive and affective goals and objectives could be reliably evaluated to determine presence/absence and clarity. Comparison of clarity ratings was made in terms of category of disability, elementary versus junior high, long-term goals versus short-term objectives and cognitive versus affective.
One hundred ninety-two (192) randomly selected IEPs from two intermediate units serving learning disabled, behavior disordered, and educable mentally retarded students in south central Pennsylvania comprised the data for the study.
Results indicated that BD teachers write affective goals and objectives more frequently than either LD or EMR teachers. Furthermore, it is possible to train raters to evaluate clarity of both cognitive and affective goals and objectives. Comparisons of clarity ratings suggest: (1) elementary and junior high LD, BD, and EMR teachers write significantly clearer cognitive goals than affective goals and objectives; (2) elementary and junior high teachers write significantly clearer cognitive long-term goals than affective long-term goals; (3) elementary teachers write significantly clearer cognitive and affective long-term goals in comparison to junior high teachers; (4) cognitive short-term objectives were significantly clearer than affective short-term objectives for both elementary and junior high students; (5) short-term cognitive objectives were significantly clearer than long-term cognitive goals for both elementary and junior high students; (6) short-term affective objectives were significantly clearer than long-term affective goals for both elementary and junior high students; (7) no significant effects were found for level or category for cognitive or affective clarity scores; and (8) affective goals and objectives addressed classroom management and not the personal development of the learner.
These results suggest the need for preservice and in-service teacher education to improve the quality of the IEP.
Issue Date:1982
Type:Text
Description:87 p.
Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1982.
URI:http://hdl.handle.net/2142/68822
Other Identifier(s):(UMI)AAI8302857
Date Available in IDEALS:2014-12-15
Date Deposited:1982


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